Higgs Theory Lecture

HIGGS THEORY LECTURE IS A GREAT SUCCESS
A COMPLEX THEORY WONDERFULLY EXPLAINED WITH VIVID DESCRIPTION AT
A HUGE EVENTBY WORLD-RENOWNWED SCIENTIST GERARD T’ HOOFT
On Wednesday, 1st
lunchtime to go to the Turner Sims
concert hall with my dad. The reason of
this visit was to see a lecture by Nobel
Prize Laureate, Gerard t’ Hooft. After a
brief introduction on his studies and life,
the lecture began to start explaining its
title: How the Higgs Theory Gives Mass to
Particles. Then, Gerard t’ Hooft went on
to describe the experiments taking place
at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at
CERN in Geneva and then went on to
more complex subjects such as Helicity,
(spin with respect to rotation axis); the
Standard Model, (a grouping of
fundamental particles) and then Gerard’s own discovery: the Weak and Electroweak forces,
(the force that binds particles together). It was also explained how particles with mass
continually ‘flip’ their Helicity, thus in turn explaining how, during a process known as
spontaneous symmetry breaking, photons get mass because of interactions with the Higgs
particle field and the Higgs Boson.
, I left school at
After the lecture, I had the opportunity to ask the
professor a question: “what is the anti-particle of the
Higgs?” the answer is that it is the same as the Higgs,
a popular characteristic with the Bosons. I also had
the opportunity to speak to some undergraduate
students about their research into Dark energy and
supernovae. On the whole, the lecture was a great
success and I cannot wait for the sequel.
By Alessandro Leoni

Many thanks to Alessandro Leoni ( Year 7) for sharing this fantastic experience with the College.

HIGGS THEORY LECTURE IS A GREAT SUCCESS

A COMPLEX THEORY WONDERFULLY EXPLAINED WITH VIVID DESCRIPTION AT A HUGE EVENTBY WORLD-RENOWNWED SCIENTIST GERARD T’ HOOFT

Capture

On Wednesday, 1st, I left school at lunchtime to go to the Turner Sims concert hall with my dad. The reason of this visit was to see a lecture by Nobel Prize Laureate, Gerard t’ Hooft. After a brief introduction on his studies and life, the lecture began to start explaining its title: How the Higgs Theory Gives Mass to Particles. Then, Gerard t’ Hooft went on to describe the experiments taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva and then went on to more complex subjects such as Helicity, (spin with respect to rotation axis); the Standard Model, (a grouping of fundamental particles) and then Gerard’s own discovery: the Weak and Electroweak forces, (the force that binds particles together). It was also explained how particles with mass continually ‘flip’ their Helicity, thus in turn explaining how, during a process known as spontaneous symmetry breaking, photons get mass because of interactions with the Higgs particle field and the Higgs Boson.

boson

After the lecture, I had the opportunity to ask the professor a question: “what is the anti-particle of the Higgs?” the answer is that it is the same as the Higgs, a popular characteristic with the Bosons. I also had the opportunity to speak to some undergraduate students about their research into Dark energy and supernovae. On the whole, the lecture was a great success and I cannot wait for the sequel.

By Alessandro Leoni